Why TOGAF 9 is now the de facto EA Framework

About this Resource

A discussion by Louw Labuschagne of the emergence of TOGAF® 9 to become the most widely accepted EA framework around the world.

"When I started my formal architecture career in the early 2000’s I was asked by the CTO of a previous employer of mine to investigate a series of architecture frameworks and to select a framework that we could use in our organization to help with the maturity of our architecture projects and also the formalisation of our architecture function. After three months of work sessions with vendors (at that time every consulting house had a propriety Architecture framework) we adopted TOGAF. I must admit that it was not ‘love at first sight’ when I first tried to read through the TOGAF version 8 document. However, when I now think back to the process, and all the mistakes we made in getting started, the best choice we made was the selection of the TOGAF framework as the basis for our architecture practice.

I can honestly say we did not select it based on the completeness or superiority of the framework, there were other propriety frameworks that were more advanced and more complete with betterguidance, but none of them had the crucial element that we wanted, a community. That single fact, an active community or eco-system, has since made TOGAF the undisputed industry standard used by architecture practitioners as highlighted by the survey results below that was conducted in 2009, a few months after TOGAF 9 was released."

Please login to continue reading this ebook.

Already a Member? Sign in here

Related Resources

Why TOGAF 9 is Now the De facto EA Standard
  • Register to Download

  • The email address is already in use, please login
  • Checking your email address . . .

  • Please add your Job Title

  • Please add your Industry

  • Please add an Interest

  • Please add your Country

  • * Minimum 6 characters long, including lower and uppercase letters, a number and symbol (!/=+_-@ )

  • Please complete missing fields
  • Passwords need to be minimum 6 characters long, including lower and uppercase letters, a number and symbol.

DEMO Search